Saturday, March 1, 2008

Illustration Friday - Leap


Here is a literal version of Leapfrog, my submission for this week's Illustration Friday. I liked the idea of childhood games like hopscotch, marbles (does anyone play them anymore), and of course leapfrog, although not usually with a frog the size of a small child, which would be pretty scary!

What do you think? Looking for some constructive criticism here -- I would really like to improve my pieces and am looking for advice from those of you with experience!! Thanks!

9 comments:

NANCY LEFKO said...

great, Michelle, as always.....

claudine hellmuth said...

perfect illo!!! I did see our neighbor girls playing hopscotch the other day actually!!

enigma said...

cute concept. the only criticism, (and this is because you asked us to..), i think the anatomy and posture of the subjects need to be improved. hope its ok. :)

Sandra said...

I have no CC as I am starting out also. The subject illustrate the topic perfectly,I love how you have added to it by the thought illustrations.

rizal said...

great awesome work.. love it

pupu said...

ahh.. the frog is big. haha i think i'll get scared. but i like the idea. really good. :)

enigma said...

well..the frog doesn't seem in the right position, and he is too big as a frog (or is it intentional?) the bowing girl is alright, but maybe she need to face more straight ahead to make it believable. sorry, its only an opinion. :) good luck

Dot said...

i think it's really sweet. the only issue i see with it is the position of the frog. he doesnt really look like he's leaping to me. but your style is great!

van dyke said...

Now THAT'S a big frog! Nice feeling overall. Good job. Reading the other comments, I am apt to agree with some points regarding body position, and size relationships. Were it up to me (and since you are seeking advice), I would focus on the expression of the main figures. Happy, sad? Is looking down in profile the best way to convey the feeling the girl has in that situation? How can we better engage the viewer? Would extending the frog's furthermost rear leg add to the feeling of 'leaping'? Can the frog smile bigger or even be laughing? Other questions that, if answered within the drawing may improve things: Are the sepia-toned portions dreams, other scenes, what the girl's thinking or what the frog's thinking? There is a green ground but no sky. Is there something that can be put there to add to the feeling of fun and whimsy or something dark, mysterious or dangerous (if that's what you want to convey...) Issues of perspective and size relationships don't really bother the viewer if questions like expression, mood, intent and purpose are answered. All controllable by expression, color, pose, etc. Good luck.